Strategic Plan 2015 - Objective 1 - Increase the use of geographic information

Drive the delivery of accessible and usable geographic information for industry and government to provoke better decisions and inspire innovation

We are leading the development of a national spatial data infrastructure for New Zealand. The spatial data infrastructure links the different geospatial data sets to make them more easily accessible for all potential users.

We can’t do this alone, so we are working alongside other central government agencies, local government, industry, other businesses with geographic information interests, Māori and iwi, and not-for-profit organisations.

We are BEST placed to do this because:

  • We have the technical skills and experience and are in the best position to provide the core spatial data infrastructure for New Zealand.
  • We are the lead agency for the New Zealand Geospatial Strategy. We are leading by example through the success of the LINZ Data Service and our cross-sector work to identify national geospatial research and development priorities.
  • We have already successfully coordinated the maintenance, release and distribution of key datasets of national interest such as aerial imagery, cadastre, and title. We can do more.

We are seeking to accomplish:

Improved efficiency in the use of geographic information across local and central government, stimulated growth and innovation based on geographic information; and leading by example in the realisation of New Zealand’s national spatial data infrastructure.

What we will achieve - national infrastructure for geographic information

There will be a national infrastructure for geographic information.

We will enable publishing of geographic information within New Zealand via the LINZ Data Service.

We will support other agencies to release geographic information, and to publish data by appropriate means.

How we will do this

  • We will contribute to the Government Chief Information Officer Partnership Framework, including the New Zealand Data Futures Partnership, and the Open Data and Information Programme initiatives.
  • We will ensure the Open Government Information and Data Programme is further developed and is well led.
  • We will build capability in managing geographic information through the Natural Resources Sector Information Programme.
  • We will lead a work programme to deliver a national spatial data infrastructure.
  • We will measure the value of geographic information and regularly promote this to decision-makers and leaders.
  • We will provide expertise, support and service for publishing geographic information. We will enable publishing of geographic information within New Zealand via the LINZ Data Service.
  • We will support the establishment of nationally consistent standards for collection, recording, holding and sharing interoperable data – making it easy for government and business to make information available and accessible.

Success will mean

  • Geographic information is being used in the decisions and operations of the public, iwi and Māori, industry and government. For example geographic information is being used to contribute to long term planning and evidence based investment in infrastructure.
  • The Government Chief Information Officer Partnership Framework, the Open Government Information and Data Programme, the Natural Resources Sector information programme and the national spatial data Infrastructure are aligned – and work coherently with other government programmes.
  • The value of geographic information is widely understood, communicated and the benefits and costs are quantified.

What we will achieve - Datasets of national importance 

Datasets of national importance that LINZ is responsible for will be accessible and reusable by government, businesses and the public.

We will have coordinated the maintenance, release and distribution of key datasets of national interest with a focus on information for addressing (see below), property (see strategic objective 2) and natural hazards (see strategic objective 3).

How we will do this

  • We will apply good data management practice for ourselves. We will promote this for other organisations responsible for datasets of national importance. For all national datasets we will ensure:
    • data is released in open formats
    • datasets are standardised
    • dataset quality is improved
  • data can be combined with, and linked to, other data.
  • We will model a stewardship and custodianship framework for the five fundamental data themes for which LINZ is responsible (cadastre and property, positioning, elevation and depth, addressing, and imagery).
  • We will establish data linking capabilities across our key systems, including the cadastre and property, and addressing data themes within the building and property sector.

Success will mean

  • Consistent and comparable spatial data is available via online services from different central, regional and local government sources.
  • The infrastructure and construction industries can work more efficiently because they can more easily integrate spatially referenced engineering design and asset information with other spatial datasets.
  • Users can easily find and combine geographic information for their own purposes.
  • Information managers have clarity about collection and management standards on geographic information

What we will achieve - establish a national addressing dataset 

We will work across government to establish a national addressing dataset that is accessible and reusable by government, businesses and the public.We will have coordinated the maintenance, release and distribution of key datasets of national interest with a focus on information for addressing (see below), property (see strategic objective 2) and natural hazards (see strategic objective 3).

How we will do this

  • We will establish partnerships with other agencies to help us create a spatial data infrastructure for addressing.
  • We will promote the use of the national addressing dataset to government agencies.
  • We will regularly engage with government, business and the public users of addressing data and respond to their infrastructure needs.

Success will mean

  • Duplication in addressing data is eliminated.
  • People and properties can be more quickly and accurately located.
  • Different information systems (such as health, education, and social welfare) containing official address as a common reference can be cross-referenced.
  • Online transactions are faster because it is quicker to validate address information.
  • There are fewer address clarification requests for local government.