Note: this guideline is issued by the Surveyor-General under section 7(1)(ga) of the Cadastral Survey Act 2002 about the Rules for Cadastral Survey 2010 and is not legally binding.

The following information relates to rule 7.2 and the physical attributes of new boundary marks. It also explains the requirements relating to extraneous boundary marks.

Boundary mark types

Boundary marks must be a traditional wooden peg, a post, or another type of peg (eg aluminum or plastic) [r 7.2(a)].  

Where another type of peg is used, it is required to be labelled as a boundary mark.  If the use of any of those is not practical, then any other type of mark can be used, which must be clearly labelled as a boundary mark [r 7.2(a)(iv)].

Iron spike as a boundary mark

An iron spike would probably not comply unless it was clearly labelled as a boundary mark.

Lead plug as a boundary mark

A lead plug in concrete would probably not comply unless it was clearly labelled as a boundary mark.

Dumpy peg as a boundary mark

A dumpy peg would generally fall into the criteria specified in rule 7.2(a)(iii) and therefore would be considered a boundary mark that must be clearly labelled.

Wooden stake as a boundary mark

A wooden stake would not generally fall into the criteria specified in rule 7.2(a)(iii) and therefore would not be considered a boundary mark.

Engraving boundary marks

Engraving or branding of lot numbers, 'R', ‘RW’ and a broad arrow are not required on boundary markers, although surveyors may continue to show them if they wish.

Extraneous boundary marks

Where a new parcel is being created, additional boundary marks may be placed along existing and new parcel boundaries.  These marks must be witnessed [r 7.3.1].

In the future, new boundaries may be calculated between these marks noting:

  • in some cases, the boundary points must be defined by survey [r 6.2(a)] and therefore witnessed on that later survey [r 7.3.1].
  • for all other cases, the points may be defined by adoption providing the relevant accuracy standards are met.

Where additional marks are placed that are not on boundaries, they must be treated as non-boundary marks in a CSD and meet the accuracy tolerances for non-boundary marks [r 3.1].

In the future, when these marks are used as boundary marks:

  • they must be defined by survey as they are new boundary points on that later survey [r 6.2(a)(ii)] and
  • the mark labelling, witnessing, and PRM requirements apply [r  7.2, r 7.3.1(c) and r 7.4.1(a)].
Last Updated: 6 April 2017
Authority: Surveyor-General - Section 7(1)(ga) of the Cadastral Survey Act 2002
LINZ OP G : 00108