This section contains information about the assessment of the likely benefit to New Zealand arising from the factor relating to trout, salmon, wildlife and game.

Whether there are or will be adequate mechanisms in place for—

  1. protecting or enhancing existing areas of significant habitats of trout, salmon, wildlife protected under section 3 of the Wildlife Act 1953, and game as defined in sections 2(1) of that Act (for example, any 1 or more of the mechanisms referred to in paragraph (b)(i) and (ii)); and
  2. providing, protecting, or improving walking access to those habitats by the public or any section of the public  (s17(2)(c))?

Key elements of this factor

There are five key elements to this factor:

  1. The relevant land must contain existing areas of significant habitats of trout, salmon, wildlife or game.
  2. There must be adequate mechanisms in place or proposed to protect or enhance the significant habitats and to provide, protect or improve walking access.
  3. The walking access must be to the significant habitats.
  4. The walking access must be available to the public or any section of the public.
  5. The protection or enhancement of the significant habitats and the provision, protection or improvement of walking access that are likely to result from the overseas investment must be additional to that which are likely to occur without the overseas investment.

Due to the walking access component, there is some overlap between this factor and the ‘Walking Access’ factor. A claim under this factor that has been made under another factor will only be counted once.

Trout, salmon, wildlife and game

This factor applies where the relevant land includes existing areas of significant habitats of trout, salmon, protected wildlife or game. An applicant must show why the habitat is significant, it is not sufficient to show that there are a few ducks living in a stream a farm paddock.

Wildlife is any animal living in a wild state. Wildlife that is protected under the Wildlife Act 1953 includes birds such as the fantail or the kereru.

The Wildlife Act also specifically defines certain wildlife as game. The current list of game includes the black swan, chukar, duck, partridge, pheasant, pukeko and quail.

Protecting or enhancing significant habitats

The applicant must show that there will be adequate mechanisms in place or proposed to protect or enhance the significant habitats. Examples of protection and enhancement mechanism include but are not limited to:

  • conditions as to pest control, fencing, fire control, erosion control, or riparian planting; or
  • covenants over the land.

In order to demonstrate a benefit under this factor, an applicant needs to show new or enhanced mechanisms for protecting and enhancing significant habitats. Generally, the benefit associated with enduring mechanisms such as a walkway easement or conservation covenants are weighted more heavily than more temporary measures.

A commitment to implement specific mechanisms will be given significantly greater weight than an agreement to consult with a relevant entity.

The continuation of current adequate mechanisms is unlikely to demonstrate any benefit.

Consultation with the Department of Conservation

Where the relevant land contains existing habitats applicants are encouraged to contact the Department of Conservation before making an application to help identify the relevance of this factor and the most appropriate mechanism for protection or enhancement of the habitats.

Walking access

See the Walking access page for further information on the provision, protection or improvement of walking access.

Making a claim

Provide the following information when making a claim under this factor:

  1. Significant Habitat:
    A description of the habitat of the trout, salmon, wildlife or game and the reason why it is significant.
  2. Walking access:
    A description of the walking access to the habitat that is intended to be provided, protected or improved. Maps showing the proposed walking access routes should be provided where relevant.
  3. Current protection or enhancement:
    Details of the current measures in place to protect or enhance the significant habitat.
  4. Current walking access:
    Details of any current public walking access arrangements to the significant habitat.
  5. Method:
    How overseas investment will result in the protection or enhancement of significant habitats and the protection, provision or improvement of walking access to those habitats (e.g. environmental covenants, fencing, constructing defined trails, installing markers identifying trails, installing signs on the relevant land).
  6. Expenditure:
    The capital expenditure (if any) required.
  7. Timeframe:
    When the protection or enhancement of the significant habitat and the provision, protection or improvement of walking access is likely to occur.
  8. Counterfactual:
    The protection, enhancement and walking access that is likely to be available or occur without the overseas investment.
  9. Uncertainties:
    Anything that may prevent the protection or enhancement of the significant habitat or the provision of walking access (e.g. consents, approvals).

Conditions of consent

All consents are granted subject to conditions. Consent conditions will generally require consent holders to deliver, and report on, the benefits claimed in their application. The OIO monitors all consents to ensure that conditions are complied with.

Last Updated: 19 August 2016