World War One through place names. Features named after Admiral John Jellicoe.

The New Zealand Dawn Service, Le Quesnoy Communal Cemetery Extension - Admiral Sir John Jellicoe
The New Zealand Dawn Service, Le Quesnoy Communal Cemetery Extension 2015 - Admiral Sir John Jellicoe

Jellicoe Cave, Northland

This feature is situated at the entrance to Whangaroa Harbour. It is named after Admiral John Jellicoe, who was given a tour of the area during his term as Governor-General in the early 1920s.

Admiral John Jellicoe was one of the most well known figures of the First World War. Indeed, Winston Churchill called him 'the only man on either side who could lose the war in an afternoon’. He was appointed commander of the British Grand Fleet in August 1914 and led it to a strategic victory in the conflict’s largest naval battle at Jutland. After becoming First Sea Lord during November 1916, Jellicoe consistently opposed the adoption of the convoy system for merchant shipping. This was to prove his undoing and he was sacked in late 1917 when the Allies continued to suffer tremendous losses to German U-Boats.

Jellicoe first travelled to New Zealand in August 1919 while undertaking a review of the Empire’s naval defences. His visit aboard the Indefatigable-Class battlecruiser HMS New Zealand proved immensely popular with the public, who came out in their thousands to view the ship and its famous passenger. Jellicoe himself was so well received that he returned to serve as Governor-General the following year.

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Jellicoe Channel, Hauraki Gulf / Tīkapa Moana

In 1934, the members of the Auckland Harbour Board moved that the channels connecting the Hauraki Gulf  / Tīkapa Moana to the Pacific Ocean be given names. They asserted that the three approach passages should each honour a popular Governor-General, with five more titles being assigned to the channels inside the Gulf.

This proposal underwent some modification. The hydrographer to the Admiralty asserted that allocating so many names to a relatively small area would hinder the direction of shipping. In response, the Harbour Board reduced the number of suggested titles down to three: Bledisloe, Craddock, and Jellicoe, with each applying to a greater expanse of water than had originally been envisaged. These changes proved acceptable to the Marine Department, which adopted the scheme during 1935.

Admiral John Jellicoe was one of the most well known figures of the First World War. Indeed, Winston Churchill called him 'the only man on either side who could lose the war in an afternoon’. He was appointed commander of the British Grand Fleet in August 1914 and led it to a strategic victory in the conflict’s largest naval battle at Jutland. After becoming First Sea Lord during November 1916, Jellicoe consistently opposed the adoption of the convoy system for merchant shipping. This was to prove his undoing and he was sacked in late 1917 when the Allies continued to suffer tremendous losses to German U-Boats.

Jellicoe first travelled to New Zealand in August 1919 while undertaking a review of the Empire’s naval defences. His visit aboard the Indefatigable-Class battlecruiser HMS New Zealand proved immensely popular with the public, who came out in their thousands to view the ship and its famous passenger. Jellicoe himself was so well received that he returned to serve as Governor-General the following year.

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Jellicoe Peak, Southern Alps

This feature was named by the Survey Department to commemorate the visit of HMS New Zealand in August 1919. The New Zealand was an Indefatigable-Class battlecruiser whose service included the Battles of Heligoland Blight, Dogger Bank, and Jutland. For her voyage to the Dominion, she had on board one of the most well known figures of the First World War, Admiral John Jellicoe.

Winston Churchill called Admiral John Jellicoe 'the only man on either side who could lose the war in an afternoon’. He was appointed commander of the British Grand Fleet in August 1914 and led it to a strategic victory in the conflict’s largest naval battle at Jutland. After becoming First Sea Lord during November 1916, Jellicoe consistently opposed the adoption of the convoy system for merchant shipping. This was to prove his undoing and he was sacked in late 1917 when the Allies continued to suffer tremendous losses to German U-Boats.

The New Zealand’s 1919 visit proved a great success, with thousands of people flocking to welcome her. Jellicoe himself was so popular that he returned to serve as Governor-General the following year.

To further commemorate the tour, the Survey Department tried to assign the name ‘Beatty Peak’, after another prominent British Admiral, to the hill next to Jellicoe Peak. However, unbeknown to them, that feature had previously been named Sturdee Peak. By a remarkable coincidence, Doveton Sturdee was himself a senior naval officer during the First World War.

The Honorary Geographic Board of New Zealand assigned the name Jellicoe Peak in 1930, and the New Zealand Geographic Board confirmed this decision in 1948.

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Jellicoe Point, Lake Taupo (Taupomoana)

This feature sits on the eastern shoreline of Lake Taupo (Taupomoana). It is named after Admiral John Jellicoe, for whom it was a favourite fishing campsite during his term as Governor-General in the early 1920s.

Admiral John Jellicoe was one of the most well known figures of the First World War. Indeed, Winston Churchill called him 'the only man on either side who could lose the war in an afternoon’. He was appointed commander of the British Grand Fleet in August 1914 and led it to a strategic victory in the conflict’s largest naval battle at Jutland. After becoming First Sea Lord during November 1916, Jellicoe consistently opposed the adoption of the convoy system for merchant shipping. This was to prove his undoing and he was sacked in late 1917 when the Allies continued to suffer tremendous losses to German U-Boats.

Jellicoe first travelled to New Zealand in August 1919 while undertaking a review of the Empire’s naval defences. His visit aboard the Indefatigable-Class battlecruiser HMS New Zealand proved immensely popular with the public, who came out in their thousands to view the ship and its famous passenger. Jellicoe himself was so well received that he returned to serve as Governor-General the following year.

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Jellicoe Pool, Tongariro River

This feature sits on the Tongariro River near to Lake Taupo. It is named after Admiral John Jellicoe, for whom it was a favourite fishing spot during his term as Governor-General between 1920 and 1924.

Admiral John Jellicoe was one of the most well known figures of the First World War. Indeed, Winston Churchill called him 'the only man on either side who could lose the war in an afternoon’. He was appointed commander of the British Grand Fleet in August 1914 and led it to a strategic victory in the conflict’s largest naval battle at Jutland. After becoming First Sea Lord during November 1916, Jellicoe consistently opposed the adoption of the convoy system for merchant shipping. This was to prove his undoing and he was sacked in late 1917 when the Allies continued to suffer tremendous losses to German U-Boats.

Jellicoe first travelled to New Zealand in August 1919 while undertaking a review of the Empire’s naval defences. His visit aboard the Indefatigable-Class battlecruiser HMS New Zealand proved immensely popular with the public, who came out in their thousands to view the ship and its famous passenger. Jellicoe himself was so well received that he returned to serve as Governor-General the following year.

The New Zealand Geographic Board officially confirmed the name Jellicoe Pool in 1987.

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Jellicoe Ridge, Canterbury

Running down from Mt Rolleston, this feature sits between the Waimakariri and Crow Rivers. The name Jellicoe Ridge first appeared on a map produced by the explorer G.N. Carrington and was recommended for official adoption in 1926 by S.A. Wiren, the editor of the New Zealand Alpine Journal.

Admiral John Jellicoe was one of the most well known figures of the First World War. Indeed, Winston Churchill called him 'the only man on either side who could lose the war in an afternoon’. He was appointed commander of the British Grand Fleet in August 1914 and led it to a strategic victory in the conflict’s largest naval battle at Jutland. After becoming First Sea Lord during November 1916, Jellicoe consistently opposed the adoption of the convoy system for merchant shipping. This was to prove his undoing and he was sacked in late 1917 when the Allies continued to suffer tremendous losses to German U-Boats.

Jellicoe first travelled to New Zealand in August 1919 while undertaking a review of the Empire’s naval defences. His visit aboard the Indefatigable-Class battlecruiser HMS New Zealand proved immensely popular with the public, who came out in their thousands to view the ship and its famous passenger. Jellicoe himself was so well received that he returned to serve as Governor-General the following year.

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